Home Search Cases Editors' Choices Ideas Resources
Editor Login

Case #338

Title:
Harvard Students Win Wage Victory for University Workers

Summary:

Harvard University dining hall workers agreed in May to a five year contract that pays nearly all of them more than the $10.25 per hour "living wage" student and alumni protesters campaigned for in the spring of 2001. The contract between the university and about 500 members of Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees International Union Local 26 was approved by 98 percent of the workers. Student protest swayed the collective bargaining process in the workers' favor.

Forty-six students and young alumni took over the building of Harvard's then-president Neil L. Rudenstine and occupied it for three weeks, using cellular phones and laptop computers to conduct a national media campaign. Outside the building other students slept in tents, hung protest banners, and organized rallies with protest chants.

The sit-in was part of a nearly three-year campaign by members of Harvard's Progressive Student Labor Movement to pay all custodians, dining hall staff and security guards a minimum of $10.25 an hour. The Cambridge City Council had earlier determined that workers need at least that much to afford to live in Cambridge.

Comments:

Harvard University dining hall workers agreed in May to a five year contract that pays nearly all of them more than the $10.25 per hour "living wage" student and alumni protesters campaigned for in the spring of 2001. The contract between the university and about 500 members of Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees International Union Local 26 was approved by 98 percent of the workers. Student protest swayed the collective bargaining process in the workers' favor.

Forty-six students and young alumni took over the building of Harvard's then-president Neil L. Rudenstine and occupied it for three weeks, using cellular phones and laptop computers to conduct a national media campaign. Outside the building other students slept in tents, hung protest banners, and organized rallies with protest chants.

The sit-in was part of a nearly three-year campaign by members of Harvard's Progressive Student Labor Movement to pay all custodians, dining hall staff and security guards a minimum of $10.25 an hour. The Cambridge City Council had earlier determined that workers need at least that much to afford to live in Cambridge.
Location: Massachusetts, US
Action: Direct
Setting: Developed World
Extent of Action: Local
Issues: Worker Rights
Year(s): 2001
Outcome successful
Source: Yes! A Journal of Positive Futures, Fall 2001, p. 9

Contacts:

Prepared By: sl 1/02
Rating: 1
 
    Comment On This Case

Database of Successful Strategies and Tactics
Copyright © 2001-2007 DBSST.org. All Rights Reserved.
Disclaimer and Notices